Feeling Good about My Week

I tried the innovative step of staying on my food plan for the last seven days and lost a pound.  But really, I didn’t care what the scale said.  What mattered to me is that I just did it this week, follwing the plan without obsessing about food (seeing, tasting, eating, smelling, tracking, or regretting it).

I’ve been trying hard to not navel-gaze, as my friend Phyllis calls it.  It’s hard for me to do because I’ve spent most of my life worrying about food things and my frustration with my body and my eating habits.  And of course the result of what the eating actually does, which just gets me into an unhealthy spiral.  Yeah, I know all about the need to understand why I’m doing what I do so I can put new habits in place to change.

But honestly, what do I not know about my eating?   Not much.  My problem isn’t the not knowing, it’s having the self confidence and sense of commitment to myself to actually do something.  It’s a lifetime problem and it won’t be resolved overnight.  Which is fine.

What matters is that I remember each day why this is important, for my health, comfort and appearance.  I am a work in progress; today is just another step along the way.  I feel really good about how the week went and didn’t care all that much what the scale said.  I pretty much ate what I wanted, including a pad thai lunch and meals out with friends.  I read labels and made the choice to not eat some snacks and meals because I knew they weren’t worth the short-term taste.  I never felt deprived or overly hungry.

I feel good about myself today.

If you had billions of dollars

… how would you spend your days?

This is a question about spending time, not spending money. If money was out of the equation and needs were being met, how would you choose to spend your time?

Someone asked me this today and my brain hasn’t been able to think of anything. I don’t have even little dreams let alone big ones — no quest to write the Great American Novel, or travel the world, or join the Peace Corps and work in Africa. It’s pretty sad that I don’t know but it’s an opportunity for me to think about what matters and is fulfilling on the inside.

Do you know what you would do?

Day One Again

Went to WW this morning and am up 1.6 lbs over the last two weeks.  Since I was eating pretty much everything not nailed down, it’s not at all a surprise.  I confess that I stopped at Dunkin Donuts on the way home and had breakast of a coffee roll and a small bottle of OJ — but I accounted for that and still managed to only use 1 flex point for the day.

My big accomplishment was not going into the grocery store.  I didn’t need to go, having made two different runs (at different stores, for different things) and a trip to the farm stand for fresh local veggies.  But this morning I wanted more more more of something snacky.  I drove to the store and parked in the lot, but sat there for a few minutes before getting out of the car.  From somewhere I found the wherewithall to just decide not to go in today. If I entered the store, I knew I would not be able to not buy something I would regret later.  So instead I just started the car, turned around and went home.

I did not starve.  I ate a big healthy salad with edamame, vegetables, and protein, plus cherries for lunch.  Dinner was a pork chop, corn on the cob, big fat Canadian tomatoes, and a bowl of fresh strawberries with pudding yogurt for dessert.  A rich fudgy low-fat fudge bar made a satisfying snack.  I’m floating away in water and Crystal Light but am full and ready to stop eating.  Food for tomorrow is planned out.

I’m just taking this one day at a time, remembering my goal of 10% of my current weight off by Christmas.  It’s doable.  Today was Day One.

So let’s see, how’s it going?

I joined WW again weekend before last, finding a new meeting on Sunday morning that I really liked. The leader is supportive but not insanely perky and the meeting members were welcoming and participated a lot. I came home inspired to do well but of course that didn’t last all that long.

I’ve been eating lunch out a lot lately, getting together with colleagues from other libraries on campus. I managed okay for the first few but by Pad Thai day, I was losing it. I don’t care what the WW book says, a portion of Pad Thai is what they bring you on the plate. I wasn’t going to leave any behind – and didn’t. Of course that didn’t stop me from eating dinner anyway, albeit less than I might have otherwise.

I didn’t go to my meeting last Sunday because I’d forgotten that it was WW day. After not going on Sunday for a year, I just grabbed breakfast and a Diet Pepsi on autopilot No way i was going to get on a scale after that. Have I gone this week to make up for it? Nope. But I am tracking my points, as awful as they are. It’s part of the accountability thing that I’ve not paid enough attention to lately. No matter what, I’ll be at my meeting on Sunday morning.

Saturday I went to a local farm and bought tons of fresh veggies and fruit. There’s a big bowl of gazpacho in the fridge that I’ve been eating on for days. Tonight I roasted peppers, onions, and beets and they taste amazing. I always forget how wonderful they are and grouse about the time to chop, even though it’s not really that much work when I just do it.

It’s clear that I need to allocate more points for lunch than for dinner. That’s when I’m more likely to eat out, and it gives me more time when I’m vertical and moving to get it digested. Dinners will be salad with a protein or veggies with a frozen dinner – portion controlled and not so tasty that I want to keep eating it. No ice cream allowed in the house; pudding yogurt with fruit is a better idea and works in another dairy.

Meanwhile I’m sitting here and watching Top Chef reruns right up until the reunion show. There’s nothing like looking at people standing up for hours cooking exotic things to make me grab another bottle of water and put my feet up.

To All The Kids Who Survived the 1930’s, 40’s, 50’s, 60’s and 70’s!!

First, we survived being born to mothers who smoked and/or drank while they were pregnant.

They took aspirin, ate blue cheese dressing, tuna from a can, and didn’t get tested for diabetes.

Then after that trauma, we were put to sleep on our tummies in baby cribs covered with bright colored lead-based paints.

We had no childproof lids on medicine bottles, doors or cabinets and when we rode our bikes, we had no helmets, not to mention, the risks we took hitch-hiking.

As infants & children, we would ride in cars with no car seats, booster seats, seat belts or air bags.

Riding in the back of a pick up on a warm day was always a special treat.

We drank water from the garden hose and NOT from a bottle.

We shared one soft drink with four friends, from one bottle and NO ONE actually died from this.

We ate cupcakes, white bread and real butter and drank Kool-aid made with sugar, but we weren’t overweight because, WE WERE ALWAYS OUTSIDE PLAYING!

We would leave home in the morning and play all day, as long as we were back when the streetlights came on.

No one was able to reach us all day. And we were O.K.

We would spend hours building our go-carts out of scraps and then ride down the hill, only to find out we forgot the brakes. After running into the bushes a few times, we learned to solve the problem.

We did not have Playstations, Nitendo’s, X-boxes, no video games at all, no 150 channels on cable, no video movies or DVD’s, no surround-sound or CD’s, no cell phones, no personal computers, no Internet or chat rooms…….

WE HAD FRIENDS and we went outside and found them!

We fell out of trees, got cut, broke bones and teeth and there were no lawsuits from these accidents.

We ate worms and mud pies made from dirt, and the worms did not live in us forever.

We were given BB guns for our 10th birthdays, made up games with sticks and tennis balls and, although we were told it would happen, we did not put out very many eyes.

We rode bikes or walked to a friend’s house and knocked on the door or rang the bell, or just walked in and talked to them!

Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team. Those who didn’t had to learn to deal with disappointment. Imagine that!!

The idea of a parent bailing us out if we broke the law was unheard of. They actually sided with the law!

These generations have produced some of the best risk-takers, problem solvers and inventors ever!

The past 50 years have been an explosion of innovation and new ideas.

We had freedom, failure, success and responsibility, and we learned HOW TO DEAL WITH IT ALL!

If YOU are one of them… CONGRATULATIONS!

Kind of makes you want to run through the house with scissors, doesn’t it?!

Source:  an email message making the rounds