More Goodwin Finds

For a genealogist, happiness is sometimes finding an obituary, especially for people who died before official records were kept. Newspaper archives such as Newspapers.com and Genealogybank.com (both require paid accounts) are great sources. Actually finding the person you look for can take a lot of time and creativity in spelling and truncation, but older papers (and older issues) are being digitized and added all the time, even for smaller jurisdictions, and I periodically continue to search for people in my direct line that have holes in their history.

A few weeks ago I wrote about finally finding an obituary for my g-g-grandfather Lemuel S. Goodwin, who died in 1907 in Suffolk, Virginia. I’d been trying to find that information for 45 years. His wife Mary Jane Thach Goodwin (well, his second wife – he had three) was my g-g-grandmother and she was another who died without any records that I could find. He was listed as a widower in the 1900 census, living with his daughter Beulah. Nope, couldn’t find her either, although I did find unsourced family trees at Ancestry that indicated she died in 1901.

Until this week. First I found Mary Jane’s obituary (above) which told me her maiden name and that, though she lived on Market Street with her husband of 42 years, her funeral would be at Bethel Church in Perquimans County, NC. I already knew that both she and her husband Lemuel were born in Perquimans County and had lived there for at least half of their married life. I knew that they had two married daughters living in that county at the time she died. But it was a big surprise to see that the funeral was there, and gave me a clue to look for burial also in the county, probably in a family cemetery (because I haven’t found it yet).

Then I found Beulah’s obituary in a different paper but also from Norfolk, VA. This one made me so sad because it described Beulah as a consistent member of her church, “bright and winsome, young and pretty and had many friends.” She died of consumption, which today we know as tuberculosis. It was was the leading cause of death in the United States, and one of the most feared diseases in the world. It was also the cause of death for Beulah’s brother William, who died in 1899. I still can’t find Beulah’s burial information but am hoping that eventually I’ll find her with her parents somewhere in Perquimans County, NC. For now, I’m happy to know where they died and to give them some closure, at least on my tree.

Miss Cooke Celebrates

Newspaper databases add new papers to their files all the time, so even though I’ve searched my direct line ancestors before, I continue to check now and then to see if new items are available. This weekend I hit pay dirt, finding two stories about my grandmother Marion Stokes Cooke (1902-1960) in The Chat, a newly added Brooklyn, NY paper on Newspapers.com.

First was “Miss Cook Celebrates Her Birthday Anniversary” from 1923. It tells me their address, that both parents were living, describes the decorations, and gives a guest list with names I recognize as including cousins. By this date, my grandmother had already graduated from Pratt Institute with a certificate in Trade Dressmaking. Some of the other guests were possibly classmates.

Marion Cooke Celebrates Her 21st Birthday -
“Miss Cook Celebrates Her Birthday Anniversary,” The Chat (Brooklyn, New York), Saturday, 12 May 1923, p.43, col. 3 ; digital image, Newspapers.com, accessed 31 Aug 2019.

The second story from 1927 describes the wedding of my grandparents as “one of the prettiest weddings of the week.” It includes her address, that only her mother was listed as a parent, that only my grandfather’s mother was listed as a parent, describes her dress (which she made), marriage location, and lists members of the wedding party – which included cousins of not only the bride but also the groom.

Flanders-Cooke Wedding announcement in The Chat (Brooklyn, NY) -
Weddings: Flanders-Cooke,” The Chat (Brooklyn, New York), Saturday, 19 March 1927, p.50 col. 5; digital image, Newspapers.com, accessed 31 Aug 2019

Newspaper Finds

Last night I did random searches at Newspapers.com, looking up people I’ve checked before. Repeating an identical search can bring different results, since new papers are added and as older issues are digitized and made available.

First, this cool article about my grandparents from the New York Daily News (Brooklyn Section), Sunday, 17 April 1927:

Daily_News_Sun__Apr_17__1927_
Daily News (New York, New York), Brooklyn Section, Sunday, 17 April 1927, p.265, col.1 ; digital access, Newspapers.com, accessed 29 June 2018.

Second find: this short classified ad from the Asbury Park Press in 1920, placed by my great-grandfather:

Bungalow

Asbury Park Evening Press (Asbury Park, New Jersey), Saturday, 24 Jan 1920, p.9, col. 3 ; digital image, Newspapers.com, accessed 29 June 2018.

I have a photo album of pictures taken in what we think is Ocean Grove, New Jersey, about 1922. But given this ad, and reviewing newer information found about the people in the photos, I believe they were taken in the summer of 1920 at the “bungalow” located from the ad. Here we have my great-grandmother Charlotte McCormick Flanders (right), next to her mother Alice Heginbotham McCormick. Next to Alice is her son, Charles McCormick and his wife Mildred Hartt McCormick. Taking the photo was probably my great-grandfather, who does appear in other pictures in the album.

McCormicks-at-Ocean-Grove

I’ve been off my game in the ancestor profile writing campaign after the death of my father, but I’m still commited to writing about those who came before me. Look for more stories soon – there’s a long list of people who need to be written about!